Grimstone vs Yellowvötn: Battle of the Giants

The importance of perspective. There’s only hope that one day nihil-hubrists will fully realize their fully of declaring impending doom after every minute geologic event in Yellowstone

VolcanoCafé

West Thumb Geyser Basin, Yellowstone lake (Yellowvötn). Photograph by unknown. West Thumb Geyser Basin, Yellowstone lake (Yellowvötn). Photograph by unknown.

In the west corner of the ring you find Yellowstone wearing blue, red and white striped trunks and in the east corner you find Grimsvötn wearing Fire & Ice colored trunks. Welcome to a spectacular fight about who is the largest, meanest volcano on the block. As the fighters are squaring off we eagerly await for the first blow from this formidable match, and there it came, it is a stunning early knock and we have a countdown to ten. The new world champion is surprisingly Grimsvötn…

Yellowstone

Steamboat_Geyser_Yellowstone_md Steamboat Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. Photograph from www.yellowstoneparknet.com

I read everything that Erik Klemetti writes and have been a big fan of his since he started the concept of volcano blogging. This week he wrote a splendid article on Yellowstone (link below) based on a paper by Jamie Farrel et al…

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Earthquake prediction at the South Icelandic Fracture Zone

An interesting read that gives a glimpse into the frustrations of seismology

VolcanoCafé

Fissure from the the first of the 2000 Icelandic earthquakes. Photograph by Ross Beyer. Fissure from the the first of the 2000 Icelandic earthquakes. Photograph by Ross Beyer.

Volumetric strainmeters are used around the Globe to try to predict earthquakes. One of the main reasons for the proliferation of them is to be found in Iceland. Before we go to the latest events in the Southern Icelandic Fracture Zone (SIFZ) we should start with the classic example from prior to the M6.6 earthquake on the 17th of June in 2000.

The 2000 Big Bump at Saurbaer strainmeter. Image by Ragnar Stefánsson. The 2000 Big Bump at Saurbaer strainmeter. Image by Ragnar Stefánsson.

The spike above is known in its highly scientific term as the “Big Bump”, it was recorded as starting on the 28th of May and ended on the 1st of June. It is believed to have been caused by a pocket of fluids being squashed upwards by the mounting strain at the fault line. Notice that the big bump lowered…

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